Author Topic: New to Ruger  (Read 442 times)

Offline Caife Trean

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New to Ruger
« on: July 13, 2021, 03:40:46 AM »
Hi all,

I went to my first appleseed event this past weekend. I'm relatively new to shooting, and currently operate a centerfire rifle, but this weekend highlighted some of the functional and logistical advantages of the .22 LR round. I'm planning on picking up a Ruger 10/22 within the next few weeks, but I have a couple questions for those experienced with this rifle:

1. What modifications if any would you recommend to improve accuracy and reliability? Is it ready to roll right out of the box or are there any known issues that are usually addressed after market?

2. With a standard .22, if I zero my sights at 25 yds, what is the corresponding far zero going to be?

3. Based on the expected far zero, what kind of sights would you recommend for this rifle, and how much magnification would I really need?
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Online ItsanSKS

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Re: New to Ruger
« Reply #1 on: July 13, 2021, 04:37:31 AM »


Welcome to the forum!

As you might expect, we frequently field questions regarding how to set up a Ruger 10/22 for use at Appleseed.  We created a flier to help:
https://appleseedinfo.org/pdf/LTR.pdf

There's also a ton of information to be found in the Appleseed LTR mega-thread, found here: https://appleseedinfo.org/smf/index.php?topic=32.0

One of the big challenges that new-in-box Ruger 10/22's tend to have, is that the magazine does not drop freely from the magazine well.  In my experience, this has been due to a great deal of over-spray of the paint/finish that is used on the receiver.  Prolonged use will wear the finish down, or you can speed the process up with some sandpaper, files, and emory cloth.  I'm certain a review of Youtube will lend some ideas towards cleaning up the magazine well. 


With regard to near zero/far zero, it depends on two things: the velocity of the ammunition being used, and the height of your sights above the bore.  With standard velocity ammunition, and typical "low" scope mounting height (or iron sights), a 25m zero = ~50yd zero.  (give or take).  High velocity ammunition can get a little further, to maybe 75yards or so without adjusting the sights. 

If you are routinely going to use this rifle beyond 25m, I suggest a scope, for the sole reason that you may quickly run out of the elevation adjustment necessary to go beyond 100yds; if, on the other hand, the rifle will mainly be used at 25m, with sporadic outings out to 100yds, a good set of tech-sights will do very well (assuming your eyesight allows the use of irons). 

Magnification is a double-edged sword.  The higher the magification, the bigger the target appears, but also the more unstable your position seems to be.  I recommend keeping the magnification to not higher than 4x, and getting a fixed power scope in the 4x-6x range would be ideal. 

Hope the above helps answer your questions, feel free to ask as many as you'd like. 

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Offline SteelThunder

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Re: New to Ruger
« Reply #2 on: July 13, 2021, 09:33:32 AM »
^^^What he said.

My own "must haves" (not really must...but it will certainly make your life much more pleasant) list for a new 10/22 are:
  • Ensuring that the magazines can drop free, as noted above
  • Replacement of the sights with Tech Sites (for irons) or a rail and a scope (for optics).  Not only are the Ruger sights...um, sub-optimal...they make sight setting changes near complete guesswork
  • An extended magazine release of some kind.  Many new 10/22s come with a little nub sticking out that is better than the original releases, however, the extended type that come back up under the trigger guard are superior.  Just use your trigger hand middle finger to release the mag
  • The stock trigger is...um, sub-optimal...and you don't HAVE to change it.  But, for a very inexpensive upgrade, consider the Volquartsen target hammer.  That $35 kit will turn a mushy, gritty, heavy crowbar of a trigger into a passable, crisp one.
  • Sling studs and swivels to accommodate a GI web sling if the rifle is not so equipped
  • A cheek riser if you are using optics.  You can use foam and vet tape to get by...but once the need is noted, go ahead and make the change permanent

It's possible to spend $1000's on Rugers to make them into space rifles...don't do that until you know how to shoot.  You don't have to have these...many people have scored Rifleman with a bone stock Ruger...but these inexpensive small adjustments will let you focus on growing your skills as a marksman vs fighting the inherent deficiencies of the platform.
« Last Edit: July 13, 2021, 09:36:22 AM by SteelThunder »
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Offline misawa

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Re: New to Ruger
« Reply #3 on: July 13, 2021, 09:44:46 AM »
The auto-bolt release modification (or buying one) is a must for my 10/22s.  It can really be a challenge when introducing a new shooter to the 10/22 explaining how to lock/release the bolt.  At least with this mod they just have to learn the magic hand jive for locking back.

Offline Monkey

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Re: New to Ruger
« Reply #4 on: July 13, 2021, 11:00:55 AM »
Not much more to add than what my esteemed brethren have already added.

If you aren't comfortable taking your trigger assembly apart to install a new trigger hammer, consider the Ruger BX trigger pack.  It's an easy, quick swap. 

For the money, it's a great upgrade.  Any better triggers will cost you much more than the BX trigger pack.

For scopes, I've had good luck with the UTG Bugbuster scopes on Amazon. 

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Offline Caife Trean

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Re: New to Ruger
« Reply #5 on: July 13, 2021, 12:15:34 PM »
Thanks for the great feedback, everyone! Much appreciated.
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Offline SteelThunder

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Re: New to Ruger
« Reply #6 on: July 13, 2021, 12:17:50 PM »
The auto-bolt release modification (or buying one) is a must for my 10/22s.  It can really be a challenge when introducing a new shooter to the 10/22 explaining how to lock/release the bolt.  At least with this mod they just have to learn the magic hand jive for locking back.

How did I forget this?   :slap:
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Offline TheMadPoet

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Re: New to Ruger
« Reply #7 on: July 13, 2021, 01:19:20 PM »
after my first Appleseed and having problems with my 33yr old 1022 I tricked it out
Kidd Heavy Chromemoly barrel
Kidd Single Stage 2lb trigger
Magpul x22 stock
Vortex DiamondBack 2-7

Basically a new gun. Now the gun is a tack driver, shooting dime size 10shot groups at 25m on a bench with bags

Been practicing and last weekend shot 4 AQT and 3 of the 4 scored over 210

yes I dropped some $ in my "new" gun but now I can't say it was the gun as it is more accurate than I am now.
The Kidd trigger is probably the first thing I would do to another 1022 if I was going to mod it. Trigger control is 60-70% of accuracy and having a crisp 2lb trigger makes a huge difference, at least for me. Also the Kidd trigger has the bolt release built in so that issue is resolved.

Did I go overkill? Yes but that is usually how I roll.
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Offline TheMenace

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Re: New to Ruger
« Reply #8 on: July 13, 2021, 03:50:00 PM »
Here's another aspect of the magazine's failure to drop free. The loose production tolerances of polymer stocks and magazines can cause them to bind. I scuff the sides of new mags on a sheet of fine (320-400 grit) sandpaper laid on a flat surface. You'll see the ridges appear and disappear as you polish the mags. Check the throat of the mag well for imperfections that can also cause mags to hang up.
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Offline Paladin223

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Re: New to Ruger
« Reply #9 on: July 13, 2021, 08:36:51 PM »
After reading the book "Customize the Ruger 10/22 " by James and Kathleen House, I decided the 10/22 Target would be the way to go. Six or seven modified 10/22's later, it's still as accurate and reliable as any other.  If finances allow, the Custom Shop 10/22 includes all the mods that would be done to a standard rifle. Only change I've done to the CS was a Brimstone Gunsmith modified standard trigger assembly.  If multiple shooters will be using the rifle, an Archangel Precision stock with QD mounted scope allows quick adjustments to different shooters.
For any standard rifle, as mentioned earlier, a few things will make things easier: "auto" bolt release, extended mag release, and an extended scope mounting rail or cantilevered scope mount.    Good shooting.

Offline FiremanBob

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Re: New to Ruger
« Reply #10 on: July 13, 2021, 09:43:24 PM »
The standard Ruger bolt release is a safety mechanism designed to prevent accidental closing of the bolt and possible consequent slam-fires. If you have a student whose rifle still has the OEM bolt release and struggles with it, you can teach him using the method in this video: https://youtu.be/wwn3t7nS9gY.

Also, teach the student that in prep, as soon as he is in shooting position he should remove his chamber flag and close the bolt, and not lock it back again until clearing after the cease-fire. I've seen too many students panic because they could not close their bolts after the Fire command in stages two and three.

Other observations on the 10/22:

If you get the target model or any aftermarket barrel, you must keep the chamber perfectly clean or you will get multiple misfires.

The OEM stock is designed for use with the OEM sights, which are very low. Using a scope or Tech-Sights will force you to use a "jaw weld" rather than a solid cheek weld unless you change to an aftermarket stock or modify it with a temporary or permanent riser. This makes a big difference in comfort and consistency while shooting. The original 50th Anniversary rifle, designed by an Appleseed instructor, had both low and high comb pieces to accommodate scope use. It's a shame they didn't make that a permanent style in the product line.
« Last Edit: July 13, 2021, 09:50:20 PM by FiremanBob »
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Offline Maximum Ordinate

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Re: New to Ruger
« Reply #11 on: July 13, 2021, 11:50:48 PM »
Also, teach the student that in prep, as soon as he is in shooting position he should remove his chamber flag and close the bolt, and not lock it back again until clearing after the cease-fire.

Every shooter should be dry firing in EVERY preparation period.  They can't do that with a bolt locked back.   ;)
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Offline Eagle Keeper

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Re: New to Ruger
« Reply #12 on: July 14, 2021, 06:01:30 AM »
To learn and study his craft  a rifleman needs a good rifle an a GI web sling.  Everything else is extra based on your goals and your budget. 

Some of the extras I recommend to help the learning process  are a  good basic scope that holds zero and lets you zero your shots on the target. That is what counts.
 I use a Center Point  4-16x40 mm ( I just sent a kid to national competition with one strapped to an air rifle, it survived a teenager on a road trip. ) . 

On loaner rifles especially with kids I like a RedDot with a 1MOA size dot , the dot is the same size as the bullet at 25yds . It simplifies teaching sights and scopes to “put the red dot where you want the bullet to go”.

If you want to upgrade the stock. I like the Archangel stock on my rifle.

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Offline Charles McKinley

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Re: New to Ruger
« Reply #13 on: July 18, 2021, 09:43:40 PM »
Change as little as possible until you can put 10 rounds in the inch square.

Way to attach a sling

Tech sights or a cantilever scope rail ( needed to get scope forward enough in prone) and scope 4x

In expensive mods to the stock to make it fit you: length of pull, cheek riser.

Ask to barrow a couple different correctly set up Liberty training rifles or instructors personal rifles until you know what you actually spending $$$ on stuff that won't work for you.  Don't fool yourself about your eyesight.  Use a rifle with tech sights before investing in them.  This paragraph should have been on top of my post.
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Offline jtdiver

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Re: New to Ruger
« Reply #14 on: July 19, 2021, 11:02:43 AM »
I would address issues as they come,  mag problem: take the magazines and check for sharp edges, with 320 grit sand paper, smooth and round edges, am referring to the "plastic" body of the mags . Cleaning and check for fit. A little goes a long way.   Also on the stock, where the mags fit into the rifle, sand and round the edges with the sand paper. I put tissue paper into the mag weld to keep grit from getting into action. This will help when inserting the mags in timed events.  Also the synthetic stocks tend to be a bit unstable and bend in hot weather.  I have built and worked with around 10, 10/22s and found mags to cause a lot of problems, second on my list is "plastic" stocks but they get the job done. Yes, upgrades are great and solve lots of problems. Take things slow and enjoy!


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Offline jtdiver

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Re: New to Ruger
« Reply #15 on: July 19, 2021, 02:58:16 PM »
sorry! your question was about sights.  I use two different sight setups.  Due to senior citizen eyes I typically rely on a scope. Keep it simple, quality scope say 3-9 x.  More than 3x for Appleseed and you get too much movement on target. 2nd setup is similar to Tech sight.
It is a aperture sights and a front post. This is takes good eyes and a bit of practice. Focus on the front post, let the target go out of focus. Find what you are comfortable with and keep working on it. Stay the course and you will gather the fruits of your labours.  :D

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Online Catch-10-22

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Re: New to Ruger
« Reply #16 on: July 19, 2021, 03:17:24 PM »
The standard Ruger bolt release is a safety mechanism designed to prevent accidental closing of the bolt and possible consequent slam-fires. If you have a student whose rifle still has the OEM bolt release and struggles with it, you can teach him using the method in this video: https://youtu.be/wwn3t7nS9gY.

Thank you so much for posting that! I have struggled to help students without the auto bolt release and this technique worked perfectly every time this weekend and the student mastered it quickly. So simple once you know.

Offline Caife Trean

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Re: New to Ruger
« Reply #17 on: July 25, 2021, 02:02:14 AM »
Quick update. I bought a 10/22 this weekend. I found what y'all said about the mag well to be true, and sanding it down made ejection easier. It came with 1" sling swivels, so I threw on some 1" nylon webbing for a hasty sling at the range to break it in. The tiny bead on the front sight was almost impossible to see at an indoor range. So far I've ordered 1.25" swivels, a proper M1 sling, fiber optic iron sights, and a scope. Once I can get what I'm hitting and what I'm aiming at to align I'll look at further enhancements. [Edit: I put the weaver rail on after I took it home and cleaned it. I found that it obscured the rear sights so I left it off when I went to the range.]
« Last Edit: July 25, 2021, 02:09:39 AM by Caife Trean »
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Offline Paladin223

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Re: New to Ruger
« Reply #18 on: July 25, 2021, 03:47:03 PM »
FYI  TechSights offers a one inch M1 style sling that works great with many stock rifles.  I keep a couple on hand to loan to new shooters who need them.
 Much quicker and easier than also switching out swivels as well.

Offline Caife Trean

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Re: New to Ruger
« Reply #19 on: July 25, 2021, 10:06:15 PM »
@Paladin223, thanks again for the tip. I've already swapped the sling swivels out. I ordered a 1.25" M1 sling off of OpticsPlanet, so it may arrive before the end of summer lol. In the mean time I'll probably have my rifles take turns with the one I already have.
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