Author Topic: Interesting Revolutionary War History not found in the books  (Read 646 times)

Offline Fred

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"Ready to eat dirt and sweat bore solvent?" - Ask me how to become an RWVA volunteer!

      "...but he that stands it now, deserves the thanks of man and woman alike..."   Paine

     "If you can read this without a silly British accent, thank a Revolutionary War veteran" - Anon.

     "We have it in our power to begin the world over again" - Thomas Paine

     What about it, do-nothings? You heard the man, jump on in...

Offline Old Dog

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Re: Interesting Revolutionary War History not found in the books
« Reply #1 on: June 10, 2007, 01:59:09 AM »
For what it's worth, it appears that last paragraph may originally have been a poem.

The entire paragraph, but broken up differently than in the original post:

This monument may unborn ages tell
How brave Young Hayward, like a hero fell,
When fighting for his countrie's liberty
Was slain, and here his body now doth lye,
He and his foe were by each other slain,
His victim's blood with his ye earth did slain,
Upon ye field he was with victory crowned,
And yet must yield his breath upon that ground.
He express't his hope in God before his death,
After his foe had yielded up his breath.
O may his death a lasting witness lye,
Against Oppressors' bloody cruelty.

After thinking about it I have to wonder if the 6th line was originally written as below and over the years miscopied?  Sounds good anyway.
His victim's blood with his ye earth did stain,
« Last Edit: June 10, 2007, 08:57:11 AM by M1A4ME »

Offline Fred

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Re: Interesting Revolutionary War History not found in the books
« Reply #2 on: July 08, 2007, 07:41:29 AM »

    Nice catch, there, M1A4ME.

    It was unclear from the version sent me what the layout was, but believe you have puzzled it out, along with the 'mistake'.

     Next time I'm there, or if crak can make a trip there, someone needs to see if the Acton monument is still there (likely) and if the tombstones quoted above are still there (less likely?). It would be interesting to see if the mistake was the stone engraver's, or the copyst's...
"Ready to eat dirt and sweat bore solvent?" - Ask me how to become an RWVA volunteer!

      "...but he that stands it now, deserves the thanks of man and woman alike..."   Paine

     "If you can read this without a silly British accent, thank a Revolutionary War veteran" - Anon.

     "We have it in our power to begin the world over again" - Thomas Paine

     What about it, do-nothings? You heard the man, jump on in...

Offline cannonman61

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Re: Interesting Revolutionary War History not found in the books
« Reply #3 on: August 01, 2007, 06:40:38 PM »
All,

The back of the awards for the Hinesville Appleseed have the following text:

                                         The American Longrifle

   This flintlock is popularly known as the "Kentucky Rifle" or "Pennsyvania Rifle". "Kentucky because of its use by the frontiersmen as they moved west to Kentucky and beyond; "Pennsylvania", because the majority of them were made by Pennsylvania gunsmiths of Gremanic descent.
   The rifle gained its world wide fame during the American Revolution when the Continental Congress passed "The Act of June 14 1777" authorizing the raising of ten companies of riflemen to join Washington's army surrounding Boston. Six companies were raised in Pennsylvania and two each from Virginia and Maryland.
   The gun and the sharpshooters who carried them were well described by John Adams in a letter to his wife Abigail: "These are an excellent species of light infantry. They use a peculiar kind of musket called a rifle. It has circular grooves within the barrel, and carries a ball with great exactness to great distance."

I though puting these on the backs of our awards would be a great way to bring out the nature of the Appleseed shoot and our heritage.

What do you guys think?  I include a picture of the front of the award. sorry for the poor flash resolution.



CM61
Artillery lends dignity to what would otherwise be a vulgar brawl.

Offline Fred

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Re: Interesting Revolutionary War History not found in the books
« Reply #4 on: August 01, 2007, 08:56:29 PM »

    Let me get this straight.

    Each RWVA instructor at your event gets one of these, right?

    At least, I wish...

    Sounds nice.

    The John Adams quote is really nice - a rifle is a "peculiar kind of musket" - indeed!

    Shows what a difference time makes...
"Ready to eat dirt and sweat bore solvent?" - Ask me how to become an RWVA volunteer!

      "...but he that stands it now, deserves the thanks of man and woman alike..."   Paine

     "If you can read this without a silly British accent, thank a Revolutionary War veteran" - Anon.

     "We have it in our power to begin the world over again" - Thomas Paine

     What about it, do-nothings? You heard the man, jump on in...

Offline cannonman61

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Re: Interesting Revolutionary War History not found in the books
« Reply #5 on: August 02, 2007, 10:36:23 PM »
                                                       The King's Shilling

Before the esatblishment of the United States Mint in Philadelphia in 1792 many coins from from different countriesas well as those monted by the individual colonies were used as specie and in general circulation.

Silver Shillings minted in England were very common in the American Colonies both pre-war and post war as well. Thes coins were of sterling silver and were 975 parts pure silver with a stiffener of 25 parts copper. This proportion was used until 1920 when it was debased to 500 parts silver and then the silver was removed altogether in 1948 when the coin was changed to a nickle - copper alloy. Finally, the coin disappeared altogether when Great Britain went to a decima system of coinage where 100 pence equaled a pound in 1971.

In practice recruits to the royal army in America as well as Great Britain were bound to military service if the accepted the King's shilling, and so the recruiting sergeants used any means or device top get a likely candidate(willing or not) to accept the coin, even to the extream of resorting to slipping it into a tankard of ale given to the man to drink to his King's health. ( and you though your recruiting sergeant was bad!)
This practice led to the common adoption of the glass bottomed tavern tankard. It allowed a man to check his ale for the dread coin and had the further benefit of showing any impurities in the ale before the consumption of said ale. (Remember this if any of the Red Hats offer you a good belt after hours!)  ;) ;D

Many of the coins present in the colonies at thier birth were minted in 1745 during the rein of King george II, our good friend GeorgeIII's father. They bore the inscription of "LIMA" as an indication of their being minted from a part of the $500,000 pound treasure of Spanish silver captured by Captain George Anson off South America in 1744 when he was on a circumnavigation of the globe. ( See, the Brits were in everyone's pockets back then and then they wondered why we got mad?)  ;D

Beware the friendly recruiter offering to buy you an ale! The more things change...........

CM61
Artillery lends dignity to what would otherwise be a vulgar brawl.