Author Topic: Modern Accuracy With a Kentucky/Pensylvania Rifle  (Read 783 times)

Offline Aim Small Hit Small

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Modern Accuracy With a Kentucky/Pensylvania Rifle
« on: January 24, 2017, 09:53:19 PM »
Like all Appleseed shooters, we have listened to the awesome feats of accuracy from the late 1700s.  What I would like to know...is there anyone with a similar black powder rifle (KY or PA Rifle either repo or authentic) who can match the accuracy of those we have heard about?  If so, I would travel a good ways to see it performed in person...maybe at a Appleseed Project Shoot?
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Offline jmdavis

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Re: Modern Accuracy With a Kentucky/Pensylvania Rifle
« Reply #1 on: January 26, 2017, 11:51:28 AM »
There are muzzleloader Silhouette shooters who shoot out to 200 yards with cap locks and flintlocks. The 200 yard target is the bear and it is 35 inches tall and 13 inches wide.

These matches are shot offhand without support, with the exception of bear which may be shot in any position without artificial support.

So in short, the answer is, "yes" there are people of the skill level in the nation. You could see some of them at the Muzzleloading Matches at Friendship Indiana in the Spring and Fall.

In the Black Powder Cartridge Silhouette realm (buffalo rifles) matches are often shot offhand at 500 yards at a 48" buffalo. They use heavy bullets, instead of round balls and the velocities often don't break the speed of sound. They also have better sights, but our club record is 9-10 hits with a rifle designed in the 1880's shot by a 75 year old.
"If a man does his best, what else is there?"  - General George S. Patton Jr

  ...We few, we happy few, we band of brothers;
  For he to-day that sheds his blood with me
  Shall be my brother...-Shakespeare, Henry V
 

"There's a great deal of talk about loyalty from the bottom to the top. Loyalty from the top down is even more necessary and is much less prevalent. One of the most frequently noted characteristics of great men who have remained great is loyalty to their subordinates."
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"Your body can't go where your mind hasn't been."
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Offline Dracomeister

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Re: Modern Accuracy With a Kentucky/Pensylvania Rifle
« Reply #2 on: January 26, 2017, 10:51:26 PM »
Elder Brother shoots a 45-90 black powder cartridge gun for 1,000 meter match. I think his projectile is something like 550 grain with a muzzle velocity of 2,300+ FPS (goes transonic at about 800 meters) and has a MO of almost 48'. He says he practices on 1 MOA targets at 600 meters,  I can't SEE 600 meters (much less 1,000), and sure as heck can't hit anything out there! ::)

You might want to look into the National Muzzle Loading Rifle Association (NMLRA) for some truely magnificant black powder shooting!
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Offline Mark Davis

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Re: Modern Accuracy With a Kentucky/Pensylvania Rifle
« Reply #3 on: January 27, 2017, 11:52:30 AM »
Large hunks of lead at moderate velocity, follow a predictable path.

Some of the truly legendary shots are pure luck fueled by skill.
Adobe walls being a prime example.

Heck, once I shot a small bore rifle chicken target off the stand at 40 meters with a 60 dollar 2" barreled .25 auto. Could I do it again? well...maybe in 1000 rounds.

Offline Aim Small Hit Small

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Re: Modern Accuracy With a Kentucky/Pensylvania Rifle
« Reply #4 on: January 31, 2017, 12:25:18 AM »
Thanks for the replies guys, but I don't think any of the answers applied to my question. I specifically inquired about the accuracy of a Pennsylvania or Kentucky rifle of the late 1700's either reproduction or authentic.

Thanks!
June 15/16 2013 Rifleman (Charlotte, NC)
Feb. 7/8 2015 Rifleman (Boone, NC) (Winterseed)
April 18/19 2015 Rifleman (Ramseur, NC)
March, 2017 RBC Rifleman and KD Qualified
(Ramseur, NC) Took a Blue Hat.
April 22/23, 2017 Rifleman Requal (243)
Ramseur, NC
January 20/21, 2018 Rifleman Requal (244) Ramseur, NC
May 4/5, 2019 Rifleman Requal (249)
Ramseur, NC
May 24/25, 2019 KD Requal
Ramseur, NC

Offline jmdavis

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Re: Modern Accuracy With a Kentucky/Pensylvania Rifle
« Reply #5 on: January 31, 2017, 01:23:20 AM »
A flintlock shot at 200 yards at a target 13 inches wide and 36 tall should answer your question. The ones that I know use Virginia Rifles with their earlier design and wider flat buttplate.

"If a man does his best, what else is there?"  - General George S. Patton Jr

  ...We few, we happy few, we band of brothers;
  For he to-day that sheds his blood with me
  Shall be my brother...-Shakespeare, Henry V
 

"There's a great deal of talk about loyalty from the bottom to the top. Loyalty from the top down is even more necessary and is much less prevalent. One of the most frequently noted characteristics of great men who have remained great is loyalty to their subordinates."
- General George S. Patton, Jr

"Your body can't go where your mind hasn't been."
- Alex Arrieta 1995 NTI Winner

Offline Jumpboot

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Re: Modern Accuracy With a Kentucky/Pensylvania Rifle
« Reply #6 on: February 11, 2017, 10:50:38 AM »
Check out the National Muzzleloading Rifle Association nmlra.org. They have several chartered groups in NC and hold a Territorial Match in April around the Fayetteville area. Very friendly folks so I'm sure they will give you a demonstration of what the Longrifles are capable of. Fair warning, flintlocks are a lot of fun and addictive!
Rifleman 6 May 2012