Author Topic: American Revolution  (Read 364 times)

Offline BrownBessEd

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American Revolution
« on: January 16, 2012, 05:19:53 PM »
If you want to brush up your Rev War history, I highly recommend this downloadable (FREE!) lecture series.  I've downloaded them and listen to them in the car.  The professor is a dynamic but down to earth speaker.   Just try the first lecture.  Thanks to Brickhouse for the free video lecture link.

http://oyc.yale.edu/history/the-american-revolution/
http://freevideolectures.com/Subject/History

1. Introduction - Freeman's Top Five Tips for Studying the American Revolution
2. Being a British Colonist
3. Being a British American
4. "Ever at Variance and Foolishly Jealous": Intercolonial Relations
5. Outraged Colonials: The Stamp Act Crisis
6. Resistance or Rebellion? (Or, What the Heck is Happening in Boston?)
7. Being a Revolutionary
8. The Logic of Resistance
9. Who Were the Loyalists?
10. Common Sense
11. Independence
12. Civil War
13. Organizing a War
14. Heroes and Villains
15. Citizens and Choices: Experiencing the Revolution in New Haven
16. The Importance of George Washington
17. The Logic of a Campaign (or, How in the World Did We Win?)
18. Fighting the Revolution: The Big Picture
19. War and Society
20. Confederation
21. A Union Without Power
22. The Road to the Constitutional Convention
23. Creating a Constitution
24. Creating a Nation
25. Being an American: The Legacy of the Revolution

About the course:
The American Revolution entailed some remarkable transformations--converting British colonists into American revolutionaries, and a cluster of colonies into a confederation of states with a common cause--but it was far more complex and enduring then the fighting of a war. As John Adams put it, "The Revolution was in the Minds of the people... before a drop of blood was drawn at Lexington"--and it continued long past America's victory at Yorktown. This course will examine the Revolution from this broad perspective, tracing the participants' shifting sense of themselves as British subjects, colonial settlers, revolutionaries, and Americans.

About the professor:
Joanne Freeman is Professor of History at Yale University. Specializing in the political culture of revolutionary and early national America, she received her Ph.D. from the University of Virginia. She is the author of Affairs of Honor: National Politics in the New Republic, which won the Best Book prize from the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic, and the editor of Alexander Hamilton: Writings. Her current project is a study of congressional violence and the culture of the U. S. Congress from the 1820s through the Civil War.

Offline Castle Mountain

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Re: American Revolution
« Reply #1 on: January 16, 2012, 05:25:18 PM »

Good stuff man! Thanks for sharing. O0 O0 O0 O0 O0

CM


If you want to brush up your Rev War history, I highly recommend this downloadable (FREE!) lecture series.  I've downloaded them and listen to them in the car.  The professor is a dynamic but down to earth speaker.   Just try the first lecture.  Thanks to Brickhouse for the free video lecture link.

http://oyc.yale.edu/history/the-american-revolution/
http://freevideolectures.com/Subject/History

1. Introduction - Freeman's Top Five Tips for Studying the American Revolution
2. Being a British Colonist
3. Being a British American
4. "Ever at Variance and Foolishly Jealous": Intercolonial Relations
5. Outraged Colonials: The Stamp Act Crisis
6. Resistance or Rebellion? (Or, What the Heck is Happening in Boston?)
7. Being a Revolutionary
8. The Logic of Resistance
9. Who Were the Loyalists?
10. Common Sense
11. Independence
12. Civil War
13. Organizing a War
14. Heroes and Villains
15. Citizens and Choices: Experiencing the Revolution in New Haven
16. The Importance of George Washington
17. The Logic of a Campaign (or, How in the World Did We Win?)
18. Fighting the Revolution: The Big Picture
19. War and Society
20. Confederation
21. A Union Without Power
22. The Road to the Constitutional Convention
23. Creating a Constitution
24. Creating a Nation
25. Being an American: The Legacy of the Revolution

About the course:
The American Revolution entailed some remarkable transformations--converting British colonists into American revolutionaries, and a cluster of colonies into a confederation of states with a common cause--but it was far more complex and enduring then the fighting of a war. As John Adams put it, "The Revolution was in the Minds of the people... before a drop of blood was drawn at Lexington"--and it continued long past America's victory at Yorktown. This course will examine the Revolution from this broad perspective, tracing the participants' shifting sense of themselves as British subjects, colonial settlers, revolutionaries, and Americans.

About the professor:
Joanne Freeman is Professor of History at Yale University. Specializing in the political culture of revolutionary and early national America, she received her Ph.D. from the University of Virginia. She is the author of Affairs of Honor: National Politics in the New Republic, which won the Best Book prize from the Society for Historians of the Early American Republic, and the editor of Alexander Hamilton: Writings. Her current project is a study of congressional violence and the culture of the U. S. Congress from the 1820s through the Civil War.