Author Topic: Animated History  (Read 2289 times)

Offline Dane

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Animated History
« on: February 16, 2010, 10:30:41 PM »
Hey Everyone!
Just wanted to share a site that I discovered today while studying some other perspectives of the Battles of Lexington and Concord.  I visited the wiki web site and while looking at the references and other things, came across a link to animated history.  I visited the web site and lo' and behold it had an animated history of the two battles.  All I could think about was how great this would be if it were available at some of our AS during the classroom sequence.  We actually had a laptop and a projector at our last AS.  Go and visit this site and see what you think.  If this link does not work Google>The Battles of Lexington and Concord.  Click on the wiki website.  Scroll to the very bottom and click on the link>The animated history.  Look in the left column and click on the Lexington/Concord link.  Click on the View animated and watch the sequence.  The book Paul Revere's Ride was one of the references used to make this animation.  (Hint:  you have to click on the red "play" arrow at the end of each sequence to continue with the entire animation.  This is so you can read the description at the top of each sequence)


www.historyanimated.com/revolutionarywaranimated/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=48&Itemid=54


Enjoy!

Dane
It is not necessary to face the bullets of
the enemy on the field of battle in order to evince
true patriotism. He who loves his home, his
native town, his country, and is ready to
make sacrifice for their honor and welfare, is the
good citizen. In him the germ of patriotism is
well developed.

Offline Brandon1

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Re: Animated History
« Reply #1 on: February 17, 2010, 01:07:54 PM »
Good job Dane! I will have to check it out at work tonight. I have dial up here at the house. :wall:
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Offline CrankE

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Re: Animated History
« Reply #2 on: February 19, 2010, 07:09:55 PM »
That's a pretty slick animation.  I had actually mentioned the benefit of something like this to Darrell last week after his talk. 

The only thing that might be annoying is the wide array of sounds they use.  My experience has been that what seems neat to you at a computer alone may not translate well to a larger group.  (In which case, turn the sound off). 

If a local copy of that animation could be downloaded (i.e. no internet needed) then it would be a slick tool. 
"Civility is the new censorship."
- Kathy in Potomac, MD

Offline Fred

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Re: Animated History
« Reply #3 on: February 19, 2010, 07:46:55 PM »

    Seems to me to be a bit pro-Brit.

    Anyone care to list the reasons why one might think that?

    Plus there are some other nit-picking, yet important issues with the factual presentation. Anyone want to say what the major one is?
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      "...but he that stands it now, deserves the thanks of man and woman alike..."   Paine

     "If you can read this without a silly British accent, thank a Revolutionary War veteran" - Anon.

     "We have it in our power to begin the world over again" - Thomas Paine

     What about it, do-nothings? You heard the man, jump on in...

Offline colycat

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Re: Animated History
« Reply #4 on: February 20, 2010, 12:33:12 PM »
Preempt the Rebels?  
Did the War start with Parker?  
The shot heard "round the world" was fired where?
Did Col. Barrett retreat or muster on the hill outside of Concord?
Did the Colonists (Pickering)lack organization or did they lack the desire to fight their countrymen?
"Only the skill of Lord Percy gets their forces back"  Was the retreat of the regulars a rout, or a skillful military maneuver?
"These are the times that try men's souls. The summer soldier and the sunshine patriot will, in this crisis, shrink from the service of their country; but he that stands it now, deserves the love and thanks of man and woman. Tyranny, like hell, is not easily conquered; yet we have this consolation with us, that the harder the conflict, the more glorious the triumph. What we obtain too cheap, we esteem too lightly: it is dearness only that gives everything its value."   T Paine

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Offline Fred

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Re: Animated History
« Reply #5 on: February 20, 2010, 04:41:13 PM »

   Good choices, all.

   But what key component favorable to the Americans did they leave out - which is, I believe, in the source they allegedly used - Fischer's "PR'sR"?
"Ready to eat dirt and sweat bore solvent?" - Ask me how to become an RWVA volunteer!

      "...but he that stands it now, deserves the thanks of man and woman alike..."   Paine

     "If you can read this without a silly British accent, thank a Revolutionary War veteran" - Anon.

     "We have it in our power to begin the world over again" - Thomas Paine

     What about it, do-nothings? You heard the man, jump on in...

Offline Gordon

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Re: Animated History
« Reply #6 on: February 20, 2010, 04:50:25 PM »
"Captain Preston, what made you go to the Concord Fight? ... Were you oppressed by the Stamp Act? ... what about the tea tax?  ... the eternal principle of liberty? ... What was the matter?"

"Young man, what we meant in going for those Redcoats was this: we always had governed ourselves and we always meant to. They didn't mean that we should".

p. 164, Fisher (emphasis added)

Offline colycat

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Re: Animated History
« Reply #7 on: February 20, 2010, 05:41:44 PM »
It must be well aimed fire.
"These are the times that try men's souls. The summer soldier and the sunshine patriot will, in this crisis, shrink from the service of their country; but he that stands it now, deserves the love and thanks of man and woman. Tyranny, like hell, is not easily conquered; yet we have this consolation with us, that the harder the conflict, the more glorious the triumph. What we obtain too cheap, we esteem too lightly: it is dearness only that gives everything its value."   T Paine

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Offline AFTERMATH

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Re: Animated History
« Reply #8 on: February 20, 2010, 10:59:04 PM »
Where's General Heath?
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