RWVA® ADAPTIVE APPLESEED
ADMISSIONS MANUAL

Version 2.015 October 2013

 

 

 

 

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© Copyright RWVA®, 15 October 2013

 



PREFACE

This Adaptive Appleseed Admissions Manual will always be a work in progress. The Team has tried to identify the most common elements of disability(ies) that are most frequently encountered at Appleseed (AS) events; this manual is a minimal guide since every AS is an entity of its own. The Team asks that every Instructor read it, and put at least the Hearing Impaired or Otherwise Hard of Hearing Shooters section, the Adaptive Appleseed™ Registration and the Down n Dirty Admission Manual sections in your notebooks, with backup copies for field use. The Hearing Impaired or Otherwise Hard of Hearing Shooters section will serve as a ‘Down-n- Dirty’ Guide or cheat sheet. The Adaptive Appleseed™ Registration and Appendix 2: Adaptive Appleseed Intake / Registration Form (The Down‑n‑Dirty Admission Manual) is a script for those not familiar with interviewing those with disabilities.

Always try to conduct any interviews away from the crowd, unless the person agrees otherwise.

Anything with the participant’s name & indications of disability must be returned to them. If you have a team member that is in the medical field, they would be the best interviewers.

Pre‑AS Communication with the relevant AS personnel is essential. We encourage all prospective adaptive participants to complete Appendix 1: Pre‑Shoot Questions to Assist and Inform AS Personnel and Appendix 2: Adaptive Appleseed Intake / Registration Form (The Down‑n‑Dirty Admission Manual), and submit to them to the Shoot Boss in advance. Someone from each venue should be reachable at least via e-mail to answer or screen a participant’s questions. Someone from the team can always be reached at adaptive_appleseed@yahoo.com.

Adaptive Appleseed event registration methods are constantly evolving so please check the Adaptive Appleseed Boards for the most current information.

Last, we ask that certain materials like The 6 Steps to Firing a Shot be made available to Adaptive. Appleseedparticipants in advance, via website or e-mail to those that self‑identify, especially for those with hearing issues, and that they read these guides and manuals.

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

My thanks to The Adaptive Appleseed Team: DrRichP, funfaler, Ishy, RedNekEngr, Unbridled Liberty, VietVet, Lyberty, and North Country Lady for writing assistance, and Fred for making all this possible. You are the best!

Tom Hudson (desertrat144)

 


List of Abbreviations and Definitions of Terms

Abbreviations

The following abbreviations and specialist terms are used in text.

Table 1: Abbreviations and Specialist Terms

Abbreviation or specialist term

Explanation

A.AS

Adaptive Appleseed

ADA

Americans with Disabilities Act

AQT

Army qualification test

AS

Appleseed

ASL

American Sign Language

CMP

Civilian Marksmanship Program

COF

Course of fire

DAV

Disabled American Veterans

EMS

Emergency Medical Services

ID

Identification

LED

Light emitting diode(s)

NRA

National Rifle Association

NSC

Non Service Connected

NSO

National Service Officer

PVA

Paralyzed Veterans of America

RWVA®

Revolutionary War Veterans Association®

SB

Shoot boss(es)

SC

Service Connected

VA

Veterans Administration

VSO

Veterans Services Organization


Introduction

Hello,

If you would like to attend an Appleseed (AS) but you have a disability, there is good news! Project Appleseed® volunteers want to help those with physical challenges to participate in this exciting and growing rifle marksmanship and American heritage program, so we have established “Adaptive. Appleseed” (A.AS). We don't like the term “disabled” here at AS because our mission is help people adapt, achieve, and overcome limitations.

General

Adaptive Appleseed is really a group of AS volunteers who are helping other AS volunteers understand the special needs of Adaptive shooters and an effort to bring this unique program to those who have physical challenges. Generally, we are not trained medical professionals, but with your guidance, we are willing to work within your limits.

Please note

To attend a shoot you must be legally allowed to possess and use firearms as defined by your State and Federal Laws. The term “disabled” when used by AS has the meanings ascribed by Public Law, Code of Federal Regulations, United States Code, and Unites States Supreme Court decisions.

What is a disability?

Simply any condition that is defined and protected by Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), and would qualify an individual for protection under current law [job, housing, etc.].

What conditions and types of disability are covered?

Generally, anything that satisfies all of ADA’s eligibility criteria. Appleseed and A.AS is not going to practice medicine or law when an individual shows up that isn’t visibly ‘disabled’. If a participant or Instructor is not totally sure if they fit, and A.AS can’t give a decisive answer, the participant in question will be 1) asked to get a Medical Doctors statement of an active disability, and ability to safely use firearms, 2) on their current Prescription Pad, 3) to include a statement of specific disability, types of movement the participant cannot do, and 4) must have an original signature only, and 5) must be dated within the last 6 months. This is the same info (you the participant) used when declaring and proving disability to your state DMV for your placard or plates, or the employer for ADA protections. Until something better is worked out, this will be a standard. This may be pricey for the legitimately disabled, for that we apologize, but this should slow down those that are inclined to push the disability definition.

What we will do

We will provide you with some incredible shooting instruction from dedicated volunteer Americans. We will walk you through the steps of firing accurate shots consistently. Along the way, you will also learn some of our country's history. We will do everything reasonably possible to make your AS experience rewarding, and will help you “improvise, adapt, and overcome” as necessary to accomplish that goal.

What is expected of you?

You must honestly fill out the “Accommodations needed” section of the Appendix 1: Pre‑Shoot Questions to Assist and Inform AS Personnel. Should you need assistance, or have a question about the shoot, please refer back to the Adaptive Appleseed Forum Board, or your specific AS Forum State Board. Should there still be a question, please contact us at the e-mail address within your specific State Board. We will try to answer back as soon as possible.

Things to keep in mind

You may certainly bring a care giver with you. Please advise us if you use an accessible van. We will try to ensure there is adequate parking and space so you can use your ramp. If you use a wheelchair, please notify us of that as well. Some ranges are not very wheelchair friendly, so it is important to inform us of any special mobility needs; however, there are situations that AS may not be able to modify for certain reasons that are beyond our control (e.g., conditions due to weather, rocks).

Most of AS instructors are not trained as medical care givers. Therefore you will need to inform your instructor of what assistance you need, or what positions you feel are ill advised due to your physical condition. Depending on the situation, your instructor may be able to help you adapt to a certain position or you may need to avoid that position altogether. You are responsible for your safety of movement and positions used during the course of fire (COF).

Remember that AS shoots are strenuous. If you need to take a break, please feel free to do so. The name of the game here is safety. If you experience difficulty while handling your firearm, it may be wise to rest. Consider also, that as you start to tire out, your ability to fire accurate shots will decrease. It might be a good idea to check with your doctor or physical therapist prior to attending an AS to make sure none of the positions will adversely affect your condition.

If you still have doubts, feel free to ‘observe’ an Appleseed Shoot, but be prepared, you may not escape learning some of your country’s history, as you will be participating in the Heritage Presentations! Please bear in mind that if you attend, the range conditions may be less than perfect, or undoable, and you will still be asked to sign the traditional waivers that everyone signs.

What to bring to Appleseed

First of all, a learnable and positive attitude is a key factor to an enjoyable shoot. Come prepared to learn, be inspired, and have fun. Bring your favorite rifle. Many people prefer the .22 caliber long rifle because its ammunition is less expensive than its high powered cousins. It is also easier on your shoulder after firing 200‑ 300 rounds per day! Please refer back to the regular AS information page for best types of slings, magazines and other equipment that is applicable to everyone. Likewise, some ranges do not allow centerfire rifles and this will be indicated on the AS information page. For additional suggestions, please refer to What to bring to your Appleseed Shoot at http://appleseedinfo.org/smf/index.php?topic=8162.msg74811#msg74811.

Medical Emergencies

RWVA® Instructors, and those who step up to volunteer in case of medical emergencies, as implied representatives of Project Appleseed®, should not exceed 'Good Samaritan Laws' set by their local jurisdiction. The Shoot Boss (SB) should print out a copy of the 'Good Samaritan Laws' in the hosting state and have a familiarity with those standards.

“In case of an emergency”, Basic Life Support may be administered by those who are trained and certified to render these services as noted by 'Good Samaritan Laws' until emergency medical services (EMS) can arrive. If there are no 'Good Samaritan Laws' in your community then one should respond in a manner which does not exceed Basic Life Support and basic First Aid by those who are trained and certified to render these services. Participants should only take medications they have brought from home or were prescribed by a medical doctor. A list of all medications and dosage information, and known medicine adverse reaction on a card in your pocket could save your life and help EMS in the event you cannot speak. Emergency medical services should be activated immediately for any potential medical emergency. When in rural areas, the SB should have a plan in place to activate EMS. These expectations should be made clear to those who volunteer to help in case of a medical emergency.”

Hearing Impaired or Otherwise Hard of Hearing Shooters

Hello, and welcome to this section. Over 43 million people in the U.S. have hunted at least 1 time in their lifetime. An estimated 20 million people in the U.S. are active hunters and an estimated >21 million people are target shooters

Hearing Impairments are any hearing/auditory disconnects that would impede a shooter from readily hearing Line Commands, or interfering with being able to participate in the Instruction phases without hearing aids. This can range from moderate tinnitus, to complete hearing loss.

Interpreter Defined

When an American Sign Language (ASL) interpreter is used, the assumption is that a family member or friend accompanying you can do this job, as hiring an interpreter is pricey.

Shooter/participant expectations: First and foremost, an honest evaluation of your hearing issues; to keep everyone safe! Next, identify where your hearing loss fits in, and then follow the appropriate guidelines (See Hearing Impaired or Otherwise Hard of Hearing Shooters a general guideline or definition).

If you have severe hearing loss, or other hearing impairments such severe tinnitus, or requiring assistance to carry on a conversation, you will be expected to bring someone or a reliable electronic translator that can relay line commands, shooting instruction, and history through colors or captioning in text if needed. Additionally, you and your care giver need to know the Hearing Impaired Notes & Tap Commands

Tap Commands System. The system is an AS standard that allows hard of hearing or otherwise hearing impaired shooters to receive corrective instructions while on the firing line. There is a lot of information and little time to present it; thus, knowing this system beforehand and bringing appropriate assistance is appreciated.

Please note that if th­­e shooter does not complete the prerequisites, AS will not in any way be obligated to admit the shooter into the event, and the shooter will (with a high probability) be turned away. Again, the main reason is the safety of the shooter, the other participants, the instructors, and the public. If in any event the Instructor Corps via AS SB does not feel comfortable with the situation, AS will not jeopardize anyone’s safety by allowing the shooter to participate pre‑ or post admission.

Hard of hearing or otherwise hearing impaired shooters will be required to use hearing protection including those with the new hearing implant technologies. Why, you ask? Everyone on the line is required to use hearing protection, if a person or 3 does not use protection, it will take away from Instruction Time explaining why, and eventually someone will think “Hey, they don’t need it, why do I?” and act on it.

You may have noticed a theme within the above paragraphs – S‑A‑F‑E‑T‑Y, yours, participants and the Staff. Appleseed takes this very seriously.

The above should not be interpreted as targeting the hard of hearing or otherwise hearing impaired; hearing impairments may be insidious (i.e., subtle or gradual) by nature. The worst is the ‘creeping up’ type of loss.

Do you have a ringing or buzz in your ears? Do you have your TV/audio volume close to or maxed out? Does someone have to tell you what was said at a movie? Do you share your side of a cell phone conversation with the whole restaurant? These are just parts of the warning signs of hearing loss or impairment.

General

1.      There is no way around a hard of hearing or otherwise hearing impaired shooter needing to know sign language or having their own interpreter or electronic translator type device with them at a shoot.

2.      There are certain words common in ASL instruction for which there are no common knowledge “signs”. Also there are also some commands that have the same sign; if you “create or morph” signs for these instances, notify SB or staff member working with you.

3.      For a potentially hard of hearing or otherwise hearing impaired shooter, there HAS to be some prerequisite work done with their interpreter or electronic device before attending a shoot in order to make sure the commands are mutually understood, and there are no delays for the hard of hearing or otherwise hearing impaired shooter, or other shooters, during the actual AS instruction. Coming to the shoot “cold turkey” will lead to frustration for the hard of hearing or otherwise hearing impaired shooter, interpreter, other participants, and most especially the SB. This may lead to asking the shooter to return at a later date after they have completed the prerequisite work.

4.      The shooter will need to practice on these signs/commands with their interpreter to make sure they are clear in their understanding of ALL before they attend the actual shoot. This is of the utmost importance for the safety of everyone at the shoot. It is not fair to everyone else if the shooter has not prepared accordingly. The other shooters should not have to suffer delays for lack of diligence on the hard of hearing or otherwise hearing impaired student's part.

5.      Rifle parts do not necessarily have signs. Therefore you will have to create signs for trigger, hammer, breech, etc.

a.       “LOAD” and “PREPARE” use the same sign. So you will have to create a new sign for “LOAD.”

b.      Use the sign for “SHOOT” in the place for “FIRE.”

6.      The A.AS team will do everything in its power to clarify any discrepancies or questions the participant or instructors may have as long if we are contacted well enough in advance of the shoot as to not disrupt or add last minute confusion.

Significantly to Moderate Impairments

The Shooter and Interpreter must know the Hearing Impaired Notes & Tap Commands. The shooter and their care giver can add other commands as necessary, but both must know and mutually understand them without confusion, at the shoot. If the shooter can barely hear well enough during instruction without hearing protection on and/or with hearing aids, then additional tap commands may be added for “Shooters! Your Preparation Period Begins Now!”, “Shooters! Your Preparation Period Has Ended!”, “With X Rounds, Load”, “Is the Line Ready?”, and “Stand Easy!” to go along with “Fire!” and “Cease Fire! Cease Fire! Cease Fire!” to be used during the COF while wearing hearing protection. Even with this, there may be too many tap commands to keep track of. One may have to use these commands in conjunction with hand signals or signs. Again, as with a hard of hearing or otherwise hearing impaired shooter, prerequisite work for the shooter may be necessary along with notification given to the SB.

Note

The interpreter will have and use eye and ear protection when on the line, be aware of ejecting hot brass, and aware of where the muzzle is. At no time will the assistant be allowed to be even with or ahead of the rifle muzzle.

Beyond Significantly to Moderate Impairments to Deaf

The shooter will have an interpreter or electronic device to relay the Range Commands. The interpreter will be positioned in such a way that they can safely see the Line Officer, and sign the range commands to the shooter. Tap Command System will help here, as you can add taps for corrections, like dragging wood, etc.

Note

The interpreter will have and use eye and ear protection when on the line, be aware of ejecting hot brass, and aware of where the muzzle is.

Hearing Impaired Notes & Tap Commands

Tap Commands

The following are the minimum 2 tap commands to be used during the COF. All other commands are to be communicated via sign language or agreed upon areas of shooter contact.

1.      Fire: One firm tap on top of the shooter's trigger shoulder

2.      “Cease Fire! Cease Fire! Cease Fire!”: Three firm taps in the middle of the shooter's back.

Note

The taps should not be so forceful as to inflict unintended consequences such as jarring the shooter enough to force a premature trigger squeeze, or destabilizing the shooter in such a manner as to force their rifle off target.

For the other commands, the interpreter or device has to be located in a position that the shooter can clearly see them or the device, the interpreter can hear the line boss at all times, and the interpreter is not violating safety rule number 1 “Always keep the muzzle pointed in a safe direction” by placing themselves in front of the shooter and thus in the line of fire.

On Stages 1 and 4 of the Army qualification test (AQT), the interpreter signs “Load” since the shooter is able to see the interpreter.

The interpreter will have and use eye and ear protection when on the line.

Alternate Communication Devices

There are devices currently under evaluation, and many more including e‑devices, programs and Applications (i.e., Apps). If they deliver and perform as anticipated, this will become another aid to shooters. Please check with the relevant AS Staff to see if they are viable options.

As an adjunct or alternative to the Tap Commands ‘Scrolling Signs’, which are ID Badge sized, battery powered LED scrolling signs that can be remotely activated by range personnel. This is something that you will have to purchase in advance of the shoot, please get the remote activated device.

When accepted for use. Bring the programmed unit and remote control with these Line Commands programmed in to it:

1.      “Shooters! Your Preparation Period Begins Now!”

2.      “With X Rounds, Load”

3.      “Fire!”

4.      “Cease Fire! Cease Fire! Cease Fire!”

5.      “Unload And Clear!”

Sample at:

These are just 2 examples of LED technology that are by current standards antique. If you can access a badge type LED type sign that can be used to relay commands, along with the alternatives previously mentioned‑ contact the A.AS Team or SB for final approval prior to the shoot. Appleseed will not be liable for any damages to any interpretive devices.

Hearing Aids, Safety, and Protection

Using hearing protection in the form of earmuffs and/or earplugs is crucial for hearing preservation.

Hearing protection devices include:

Earmuffs

Earmuffs fit around the head and over the ear to provide a tight acoustic seal. Often large rectangular muffs may interfere with the stock section as it is firmly placed near the shooters cheek. The stock of the firearm can lift the earmuff slightly from the cheek surface, exposing the ear canal to sound, thereby lessening the sound protection ability. Some earmuffs are designed to eliminate the point of contact of the muff with the cheek plate on the stock. Rounded muffs and tapered muffs allow the stock to fit firmly against the cheek and yet not come into contact with the earmuff. There are also muffs that will fit around the neck and allow people to use a wide brimmed hat.

Earplugs

Earplugs are placed into the ear canal to form a seal and block sound. There are different types of earplugs including custom made products, foam or silastic ear plugs. Frequently, those that are custom made may have to be remade after 2 years, as the material shrinks and/or deteriorates. The ear canal over time may change in size, therefore resulting in a poor fit and less protection. Foam inserts can be excellent and are often quite comfortable and cheaper than earmuffs or custom made ear inserts. Foam earplugs are lighter and more easily packed in such activities as mountain hunting, and when shooters are wearing wide brimmed hats. There are some thermal effects using earplugs, which can be a disadvantage. Specifically in cold weather, the foam does not seem to be as occlusive as it is in warmer weather and therefore greater noise reduction can be achieved with a muff in very cold weather when compared to the foam ear insert. Lastly, there are silastic earplugs, which have flanges on them and are in different sizes.

Electronic Earplugs or Earmuffs

Options for hearing protection also include electronic earplugs or electronic earmuffs. These specifically are designed to allow the person shooting to hear environmental sounds or communicate more easily with family or friends while wearing ear protection. When a firearm is discharged, a special filter closes, within the device, to eliminate noise over 85 decibels, thus protecting the hearing. However these devices are generally not as effective in noise reduction. As the sound (traveling about 761 mph, or 1100 feet/second) hits the electronic device, there is a 0.5 to 1 millisecond period of time before the internal circuitry can be completely activated to suppress the sound. According to OSHA guidelines, these very minute bursts are not prolonged enough to cause significant damage.

Hearing Aids

So how does one with hearing loss accomplish both safety and protection while shooting? It is a simple answer ‑ wear your hearing aids.

Sound levels from firearms ranges from 140 to >170 dB SPL and are so excessively loud that they exceed the output capabilities of most hearing aids. The average hearing aid is capable of producing sound outputs around 120 dB SPL, thus firearm noise exceeds the limits a hearing aid can amplify. In fact most hearing aids are programmed by the hearing care professional to reduce the amplification of loud sounds above 100 dB SPL to provide comfort as well as to protect the wearer from further hearing damage. Check with your provider to make sure that regularly exceeding the cut off limits won't harm the hearing aids over time.

Although this sounds so simple it is important to note this solution is not going to work for every hearing aid wearer. For example persons wearing open fitting behind‑the‑ear (BTE) hearing aids will not be protected because their ear canal is not sealed by an earmold.

Ultimately the effectiveness of a hearing aid to provide protection from firearm noise damage is heavily dependent upon the fit of the hearing aid. It is important the hearing aid has a snug fit to reduce the likelihood of sound entering the ear. If the hearing aid or earmold has any sort of vent, we recommend further protection to temporarily plug this vent while shooting. Discuss this with your hearing care professional, they will be able to assist you with this. Also bring spare batteries with you, after putting in fresh batteries, especially during cold weather.

Hearing Aid Users

Please check with your provider about how to work with them on a rifle range. Cochlear or similar implant users may be asked to demonstrate the effectiveness of the repairs, usually just by conversation. You will have to be able to deaden ambient noise equal to using hearing protection. At this time an implant will not disqualify you from A.AS.

Note: Hearing protection will still be required to participate for all hearing aid users.

Sight Impaired Shooters

You must be able to legally drive in your state. This is the minimum sight condition for participation. If you need assistance, our instructors may be able to help.

Physically Impaired Shooters

Veterans

Thank you for your service! We will do everything reasonably possible to make your AS experience rewarding, and will help you “improvise, adapt, and overcome” as necessary to accomplish that goal. Once you demonstrate proof of your Disabled Veteran Status you may participate free during the shoot. You must provide:

1.      A current Veterans Administration (VA) Card (the one that you use for appointments)

a.  Service Connected (SC) will only need to show this card, as long as it shows this status.

2.      Non Service Connected (NSC) also a current VA Card and/or Disabled Veteran's group membership card (i.e. PVA, DAV (non‑Auxiliary), or another disabled national service group) whose full membership is based on personal disability or,

a.  Any state or federal letters granting a Veteran's exemption, such as a hunting/fishing license, disabled placards or license plates, State Driver’s License that indicates a disability, or Property Tax exemption, or

b. Current doctor's statement mentioned above.

3.      An instructor will take you aside from the Registration table to verify eligibility status and to discuss the general assistance you will need. This is the time to frankly discuss issues, (e.g. movement, your specific fatigue indicators, heat or cold sensitivity, photo sensitivity [do you sunburn due to medications?]), and any other issues that you think may help us help you. You may want to make a through list prior to the shoot. See Idea below.

Please note: THE SHOOT BOSS (SB) HAS THE FINAL SAY AS TO ALLOW OR DISALLOW AN ID CARD OR PARTICIPATION.

Note

The AS Instructor taking this information will return it to you at the end of that day’s shoot; AS may keep disability information for training purposes, but it will not have your name or other personally identifying disability information.

Idea

One thing to use, is a list of signs, or ‘changes’ in behavior when one starts to get tired or fatigued; it is only fair to others and the Staff if the Care Giver isn’t along. A shooter can remove themselves from the line, or an Instructor can, with your implied consent, given by the list. Shooters won’t be removed from the shoot, and can return when they have had a chance to rest.

Adaptive Equipment

Appleseed does not provide adaptive equipment, but the VA does as long as you can get it incorporated into your treatment plan. If you encounter problems, a patient advocate located at any VA hospital or the PVA or DAV National Service Officer (NSO) or a Veterans Services Organization (VSO) can help. Another good source to start is The Winter Sports Clinics at Snow Mass, Colorado. There are similar clinics held nationwide where full bore, full range shooting is held. These clinics are for spinal cord injury and select neurological conditions. Contact your social worker for details and eligibility. Note, under current Federal Court rulings, sports participation is now a §504 Civil Right.

Civilians (no prior military)

If you have no prior military service, this is your section. If you demonstrate proof of your Disabled Status you may participate free during the shoot. You must provide:

1.      A current Disabled Group membership card, showing ‘Full Membership’ in your name, where the membership is based on personal disability or,

a.       Any state or federal letters granting a Disability Exemption, such as hunting/fishing license, disabled placards or license plates, State Driver’s License that indicates a disability, or Property Tax exemption, a current Medic Alert or nationally recognized equal card or letter, or

b.      Current doctor's statement mentioned above

2.      An instructor will take you aside from the Registration table to verify eligibility status and to discuss the general assistance you will need. This is the time to frankly discuss issues, (e.g. movement, your specific fatigue indicators, heat or cold sensitivity, photo sensitivity [do you sunburn due to medications?]), and any other issues that may help us help you. You may want to make a thorough list prior to the shoot. See Idea below.

Please note: THE SHOOT BOSS (SB) HAS THE FINAL SAY AS TO ALLOW OR DISALLOW AN ID CARD OR PARTICIPATION.

Those with any hearing impairments are asked to read, and understand additional requirements in the Hearing Impaired or Otherwise Hard of Hearing Shooters Section.

Note

The AS Instructor taking this information will return it to you at the end of that day’s shoot; AS may keep disability information for training purposes, but it will not have your name or other personally identifying disability information.

Please leave your rifle and ammo in your locked vehicle until instructed to bring them out.

If you have any questions or concerns, please e-mail us at: adaptive_appleseed@yahoo.com

Idea

One thing to use, is a list of signs, or ‘changes’ in behavior when one starts to get tired or fatigued; it is only fair to others and the Staff if the care giver isn’t along. A shooter can remove themselves from the line, or an Instructor can , with my implied consent given by the list. Shooters won’t be removed from the shoot, and can return when they have had a chance to rest.

Please note: THE SHOOT BOSS HAS THE FINAL SAY AS TO ALLOW OR DISALLOW AN ID CARD OR PARTICIPATION.

Appleseed does not provide adaptive equipment, but various city Adaptive Recreational Departments may. Another possible source may be Shooting Clubs & Ranges that have a membership in National Rifle Association (NRA) or Civilian Marksmanship Program (CMP) affiliated organizations. There are no guarantees on this, but the answer is “No!” until you ask. Note, under current Federal Court rulings, sports participation is now a §504 Civil Right so there may be help from your town's Adaptive Recreation Program should they have one.

Assistive Devices, Supports Allowed

Please note that the use of medically needed supports, assistive devices, etc. will not disqualify you in getting the Rifleman Badge® as long as you shoot the necessary points, and otherwise qualify. All supports, chairs, braces, etc. must be physically stable and safe. All mobility devices (chairs, scooters, etc) are to be turned off once you are on the line. A dangling 'captured key' out of its normal key slot is a quick safety check for Line personnel.

Shooting Positions

Adaptive shooters are encouraged to try the positions being taught (i.e., standing, seated, and prone positions) when possible and if it can do it safely. You’ll gain more confidence and ability if you try something outside of your comfort zone.

Nonetheless, being medically unable to shoot from certain positions (i.e., standing, seated, and prone positions) will not disqualify the shooter from the Rifleman Badge, if the shooter earns the required scores

Additional Helpful Items

Include extra fluids (non‑potent potables) cool, cold, or hot depending on the season, and a way to maintain their temperature. If you use a cooling vest, bring extra gel packs. These packs can also be warmed for cold weather. Portable or pop‑up shade devices are helpful in the heat and rain. Also the sites are usually primitive, (i.e., no hand washing stations or running water, maybe a regular port‑a‑potty at best, and no electricity). Make sure all your electronic support devices are fully charged, or have fresh batteries before showing up.

Adaptive Appleseed Registration

You have indicated that you are Disabled or a Disabled Veteran. To register for Adaptive Appleseed, please go to EventBright, and when registering check “GUEST”.

By filling out the information in Appendix 1: Pre‑Shoot Questions to Assist and Inform AS Personnel and Appendix 2: Adaptive Appleseed Intake / Registration Form (The Down‑n‑Dirty Admission Manual), and e‑mailing it to the Shoot Boss listed, on the registration page, this will serve as ‘heads up’ that an adaptive shooter will be attending. Please note this will not be identifiable to you individually as far as AS records are concerned.

Once at the shoot,

·         Please evaluate the range

    • Can you get to the targets, shade, rest rooms, etc?

If the range & facilities look feasible, locate the SB (i.e., Green Hat), or the assigned Instructor (they wear marked Red or Orange hats) handling the checking in. and check in.

·         If they are very busy, pick an outer lane that is friendly to how you get around by placing your shooting mat and/or pop up shade devices there.

·         You will have part of the firing lectures delivered at the 25 meter line, or further out if full distance is used.

Otherwise, check in; they will assign someone to review the documentation required, and get into more detail about how they assist you. This portion will occur well away from everyone else. Notes will be made, but not identify you. You will get the copy of the notes back at the end of the first days shoot or earlier if you have to leave. It is your responsibility to bring any adaptive equipment needed.

Please refer to the Assistive Devices, Supports Allowed of this manual for guideline on their use.

Please leave your rifle and ammo in your locked vehicle until instructed to bring them out.

Revision History

Revision #

Revision Date

Revision Description

1.1.0– 090509

March 05, 2010

§  Document Creation

2.0 10152013

October 15, 2013

§  Major revisions by desertrat144, DrRichP, and North Country Lady

 


Appendix 1: Pre‑Shoot Questions to Assist and Inform AS Personnel

Please note that if the shooter does not complete the prerequisites, Appleseed will not in any way be obligated to admit the shooter into the event, and the shooter will (with a high probability) be turned away.

The Shoot Boss has the Final Say on whether or not to admit an individual, or accept ID offered.

I will be (check appropriate box):  Participating  Assisting a shooter  Observing

Limitation type: (e.g., Paraplegic, Amputee, Other):

____________________________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________________________

Accommodations needed (if any):

____________________________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________________________

Movement Impaired: What type assistance do you use? Scooter, wheel chair, other:

____________________________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________________________

What type of vehicle do you use? Regular, Ramp Van, other:

____________________________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________________________

Special Parking needed: _______________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________________________

Medication side effects: burn easily, cause tremors, other:

____________________________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________

PLEASE NOTE: Appleseed is not concerned about specific medication types; however, if you appear to be intoxicated after use, you will be asked to leave the firing line.

 


Appendix 2: Adaptive Appleseed Intake / Registration Form (The DownnDirty Admission Manual)

Did the person pre‑register?     YES            NO

Register as Disabled?               YES            NO

Read the Admissions Manual on the Adaptive AS Public Board?     YES            NO

If “no,:” quickly assess whether the individual will be able to do the COF by further discussion of it, including AS expectations of a shooter, and what the shooter must do during this time.

 Remind the shooter about the NO CONCEALED CARRY policy.

 Remind the shooter that animals ARE NOT allowed near or on the lines; Service Animals are up to the SB.[1]

 Remind the shooter that the SB is the final authority for AS at this shoot.[2]

Proof of Disability

Veterans

Thank the shooter for her/his service to our country, regardless of age[3]

1.      A current VA card (used for appointments, and that has name and picture). Service Connected (SC) will need only to show this card, as long as it shows this status.

2.      Non‑Service Connected (NSC) also need to show a current:

·         Disabled Veteran’s group membership card

o   (e.g. Paralyzed Veterans of America, Disabled American Veterans, another disabled)

·         Veterans national service group whose full membership is based on personal disability)

·         Any State or Federal letters granting a veteran's exemption, such as a hunting/fishing license, property tax exemption or license plate or disabled placard, license plate

·         Driver's license that indicates a disability.

Civilians (other than Veterans)

1.      A current Disabled Group Full Membership card, if the membership is based on personal disability

2.      Any state or federal letters granting a disability exemption, such as a hunting/fishing license,

·         Disabled placard or license plate, driver's license that indicates a disability, property tax exemption

·         Current medic alert, or nationally recognized card or letter equal to 1 of these.

Other Issues[4]

 Vision: wears glasses or brought proper eye protection

 Medications: side effects such as severe tinnitus, dizziness, breathing problems, appears intoxicated, or other.

 Are ground / range conditions doable?

 Hearing: uses hearing aids, needs a sign language interpreter, needs tap commands (1 firm tap on the shoulder of the trigger hand to “fire,” or 3 firm taps in the middle of the back for “cease fire”), and must have proper ear protection even if deaf.

 When in doubt about the ID offered, or the ability to participate (ie, needs special equipment, but didn't bring it), report this to the SB for final decisions

 Remind the shooter again that the SB is the final authority.

 Explain that any adaptive medically necessary equipment use will not disqualify the shooter from the Rifleman Badge, if the shooter earns the required scores.

Likewise, being medically unable to shoot from certain positions will not disqualify the shooter from the Rifleman Badge, if the shooter earns the required scores.

Explain adaptations needed:

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________

______________________________________________________________________________


 

Evaluator: ________________________________ SB: _________________________________

 

Site of AS: ___________________________________________________ Dates: ___________



[1] Dog Policy, including Service Animals is still being worked out on a regional basis.

[2] All SBs will have A.AS Team 24/7 phone contact numbers for the A.AS Team in the event of a question or dispute.

[3] Depending on proximity to Revolutionary War dates of note, and Holidays, and with their permission; attending Veterans should be acknowledged.

[4] Depending on answers or observed side affects you may be asked to not participate due to safety factors.